Welcome to the future. A new step in the evolution of performance wave riding and one as profound as the modern thruster.

We introduce you to the Corby, a modern planing hull, designed and developed by Coreban Stand Up Paddling. Although the concept of planing hulls is not new to surfboard design, and we can trace it back to Bob Simmons who designed the first planing hull board back in 1948, the concept was somewhat lost for the past 60 years, especially in performance surfing.

Planing hulls are designed to create lift, as the board speeds up. We see this concept used extensively in the design of wake boards and water-skis, as they skim across the surface of the water. Although things change a bit when waves are added to the equation, the concept remains the same and a few, simple design features are used to achieve this. These features can be summed up with the following;

Flatter Rocker: A flatter rocker, means better glide, the board will push less water and the water will pass along its length with ease, enabling the board to accelerate faster.

Parallel Rails: This allows water to flow in a more streamline path, and in turn creates less resistance.

Bottom Contours: Concaves are used to channel water along the length of the board and, create air pockets, which enable lift.

Hard Edge: A hard edge is used for water release, the faster and more efficient water can release, the less drag the board creates. Allowing the board to go faster.

These elements combined add up to a board that will paddle faster, accelerate quicker, enable more speed on the wave, and maintain that speed through flatter and slower sections.

Due to the parallel outline of a planing hull, we find a larger distribution of volume. This means a planing hull will inherently have more volume than a board the same size with a traditional surf outline. The benefit of this, is that you are able to ride a shorter board… and a shorter board means more maneuverability. The Corby comes in three sizes: the 7’2”, 7”6” and 7’10” and we have an 8’4 dropping soon. We recommend you ride yours at least 6” shorter than your standard performance SUP.

Now you have a board, which is more stable, faster and more maneuverable. The only question is, why have you not been riding one your whole life?

 

Tom King Working it on his backhand, a shorter board means tighter turns. Photo : Mel

Tom King working it on his backhand, a shorter board means tighter turns. Photo: Melissa Clark

 

Tarryn with a massive frontside snap, on a tiny wave. Gotta love that speed!

Tarryn with a massive frontside snap, on a tiny wave. Gotta love that speed!

 

The Corby flies in all conditions, here Tom King uitilizes his speed and lays it on the rail.

The Corby flies in all conditions, here Tom King utilizes his speed and lays it on the rail.

 

Mike Theron banks off the bottom, as he sets up for what is to come. Photo: Lizane Theron.

 

Mike Theron hanging on as his 7'10 corby accelerates through the secton

Mike Theron hanging on, as his 7’10 Corby accelerates through the section.

 

Mike Theron Snap.

Mike Theron – Snap.

 

Tom on his 7'2 corby with five over the nose.

Tom King on his 7’2 Corby with five over the nose.

 

Tarryn with her 7'2 Corby

Tarryn with her 7’2 Corby